TGW: On the Interview Trail

Marcus Georges-Hunt averaged a career-high 16.7 points on 45.4 percent shooting in 2015-16
May 11, 2016


By Matt Winkeljohn | The Good Word

Fresh off graduating from Georgia Tech, Marcus Georges-Hunt is busy interviewing for jobs in a physical process that included a dip in the PIT.

Even before he took a degree last Saturday in Science, Technology and Culture, the four-year starter played in the Portsmouth (Va.) Invitational Tournament (PIT), a gathering of 64 recent college basketball players split into eight teams.

That audition went well.

With NBA scouts and those from other professional leagues scribbling on notepads in the crowd, Georges-Hunt averaged 12.7 points in three games off the bench. He led his squad – the Sports Norfolk Club – with 15 points in a semifinal win, and added five steals in that mid-April game.

Although the 6-foot-5, 220-pound forward/guard is not currently projected to be selected in next month’s two-round NBA draft – like PIT alumni Rick Barry, Earl Monroe, Dave Cowens, John Stockton and Scottie Pippen – maybe he’ll one day land on the list of top undrafted players to make it in the NBA as PIT alumni.

That group includes former Tech sharpshooter Anthony Morrow, now with Oklahoma City, Hawks forward Kent Bazemore and Hornets guard Jeremy Lin.

It didn’t hurt Georges-Hunt’s cause that he made 9-of-17 3-pointers in three games. That’s been a focus in workouts, most of which have been on The Flats.

“It’s kind of the same but without school,” he said after Tuesday’s session in the Zelnak Center. “You try to tune up your weaknesses. One of my weaknesses is knocking down the 3-ball so a lot of reps. And ball handling, just tightening it up.

“Playing point this year really helped a lot. Scouts didn’t know if I could handle the ball or not, and that will really help me in the future.”

Georges-Hunt, who started all but one game in his Tech career, moved from the wing to point guard in the middle of the Yellow Jackets’ ACC slate, and put together his best season on the way to earning third-team all-conference honors.

He averaged a career-high 16.7 points on 45.4 percent shooting, banked a career-high 119 assists (against 74 turnovers) and added 122 rebounds in 36 games.

His rebounding numbers were higher in each of his first three years, but he handled the ball much more and wasn’t in position to rebound as much this past season once he slid to the point.

In ACC action, Georges-Hunt averaged 18.1 points on 48.6 shooting and 32.1 percent from beyond the arc.

He’s already had an interview and a workout in Boston with Celtics officials, and next week will meet with the Brooklyn Nets and Detroit Pistons.

“The questions start out with background,” said the North Clayton High School graduate. “They try to get to know you, and basketball-wise they asked if I feel comfortable playing off the ball, how do I feel playing with the ball in my hands, guarding a [small forward], guarding a [power forward] when teams go small.

“They feel like I have the body type to do it, the size, and that’s one thing I do have an advantage of coming out of college. My body structure is different than a lot of combo guards.”

Georges-Hunt has conducted interviews of his own, and will go with Michigan-based agent Charles Tucker. He represents Jabari Parker and in the past worked with Magic Johnson, Steve Smith and Glenn Robinson among others.

“It’s like recruiting in high school,” he said. “They come to see you, try to have dinner with you and discuss what they have planned. You try to get to know people and figure out what the best situation is for me.”

With less structure and no school, there’s been more time. He’s living at home and commuting to Tech for workouts.

Soon, Georges-Hunt will work in the Tarkanian Training Center with other aspiring pros under the tutelage of Willie Anderson, Tony Ragland, Todd Triplett and more.

“I’m supposed to go out and train a little bit in Las Vegas, and keep waiting on the phone calls from teams that are interested,” he said. “I get to see my son a lot more, spend time with my family. It’s kind of cool.

“You work out on your own time. You don’t have to worry about rushing after the workout to get to class or anything. It’s a lot more chill.”